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Posts from the ‘Atheism’ Category

To the Glory of God

The most boring question you can ask of any religion is whether it is true.

So says Alain de Botton, philosopher, writer, and founder of an organization called “The School of Life,” a kind of church for atheists. de Botton started the school out of a conviction that religions have a few useful traditions, rituals, and practices that are worth borrowing and adapting in the ongoing project of becoming kind and fulfilled and generally decent human beings. The truth of the matter doesn’t really matter. What does matter is whether there might be some useful things to salvage from these historical traditions as we continue the steady march of secular progress. Read more

How Not to Cross a Boundary

Gretta Vosper has been making headlines for a while now. She’s the pastor of West Hill United Church in Toronto. She also claims to be an atheist. According to a recent article at Vice News, Vosper realized back in 2001 that the idea of a supernatural being who intervened in the affairs of the world was a very silly thing to believe.  She has, nevertheless, been soldiering on in her church for the last decade and a half in the service of the more worthy and “progressive” concerns that she feels the church ought to be about. Read more

Hints and Glimmers (A Tale of Two Movies)

I have always been interested in the reasons people have for accepting or rejecting the existence of God. It’s even more interesting to look at how people frame their own reasons for these decisions. So often, things are framed in stark terms of darkness and light, good and evil, obvious willful stupidity and luminous intellectual clarity, callous depravity and laudable moral sensitivity. This is true on both sides, of course. There are no shortage of eager atheists and Christians who understand and explain themselves and their decisions in these terms. As if no thinking, moral person could possibly come to any other conclusions about massive existential questions of God, meaning, truth, goodness, and beauty than the ones they happen to have arrived at!

Except things are a bit more ambiguous than that in the real world. Read more

Ruts and Ruins

I often hear some version or other of the well-worn argument that faith in God is for the weak, the intellectually deficient, the cowardly, the lonely, the marginalized and disenfranchised, or those staring down the prospect of death and grasping at something—anything!—to make their pain more bearable.  The healthy, the strong, the educated and influential, the sane—these are imagined to have no need for such supernatural aids.   Religion is a crutch for those who can’t (or won’t) face life as it really is, in all of its starkness. Read more

Blind About Faith

Over the last few months, I’ve been following a blog by former Seventh Day Adventist pastor Ryan Bell. The blog is called Year Without God, and chronicles Bell’s decision to take a break from God, walk away from the church, and try living like an atheist for a year. I have more than a few reservations about the project itself (I’ve written about them here), but it has been very interesting to ride along with Bell in the post-church, post-God landscape. Read more

Two Hands

I notice her standing in line at the café.  She’s young, attractive, and has an easy smile. Everything about her appearance screams confidence and self-assurance.  She’s dressed stylishly, I suppose, a little bit provocative or edgy or something (as if I knew a thing about style).  She turns toward me and I notice her shirt.  It’s tight and black and it has what looks like a Jack Daniels logo on the front.  But it doesn’t say “Jack Daniels.”  It says, rather, in bold, bracing white letters, “100% PURE ATHEIST.”  Underneath, in smaller letters, “Two hands at work for good in the world are more useful than a thousand folded in prayer.”  I sigh, almost audibly.  I would have preferred Jack Daniels. Read more

Riding with Richard in the Land of Atheist Devotion

It’s Ash Wednesday, a day for sober reflection on, among other things, what it is to be a human being.  And what better person to usher us into a conversation on this weighty and important matter than… Richard Dawkins.  Wait, what?  Richard Dawkins?   As in the crusading evangelist for atheism?  As in that famous biologist who holds any and all religious beliefs in utter contempt and never allows an opportunity to heap scorn upon supernatural belief to pass him by?  As in the self-proclaimed champion of all things rational and scientific?  That Richard Dawkins.  Yes, that one. Read more

Look at Me, I’m Taking Atheism for a Spin!

So, this one is generating a bit of discussion online today.  Apparently Ryan Bell, an American pastor (or former pastor), is going to give atheism a try for a year.  He has found himself, over the last number of years, following the well-worn ecclesial trail from orthodoxy to heterodoxy and has arrived at the point where he’s just not sure he can do the whole God thing any longer.  He’s not sure what he believes any more, so he’s going to play the field.

Starting with atheism: Read more

On Choosing to See

Reading David Bentley Hart makes me happy to be a Christian.  The closing few pages of The Experience of God are simply a joy to read.  Hart’s diagnosis of our present cultural moment with all of its lightly informed and category-confusing debates about atheism and religious belief is penetrating and razor-sharp (not to mention more than a little unsettling!). More importantly, though, his call to return to wonder at the very heart of existence and gratitude toward its source, is welcome and necessary.

It’s easy to gloss over long-ish quotes, I know.  But resist the urge in this case.  Hart has much to say that is worth thinking about.  And he says it, as usual, in truly arresting ways. Read more

“We Spend So Much of Our Lives Wandering in Dreams”

A meeting cancellation last night left me with the delightful predicament of how to fill a few an unexpected few free hours.  Option A was parking myself on the couch and watching a hockey game, but that space was, lamentably, already occupied by my wife and daughter who were engrossed in a movie.  So, naturally, I decided to pick up a book by David Bentley Hart 🙂 (I’ve written before about the delights and challenges of reading Hart before here).  The Experience of God is not quite the test of one’s vocabulary (and the blow to one’s pride) as some of Hart’s other works, but it’s still not exactly the shallow end of the pool. Read more

Hope, Obviously

“There are no atheists in foxholes,” goes the famous aphorism.  It’s meant, I suppose, to get at the idea that when you’re face to face with darkness and death and horror and suffering, atheism suddenly becomes a less credible option.  The reality of death makes believers, or at least desperate hopers out of us all.  When our lives are under threat, God seems more palatable.  That’s the idea, as I understand it at least. Read more

Wednesday Miscellany

A few reflections on unrelated themes for a Wednesday morning…

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I was having a conversation with a person this morning who has been navigating the murky waters of trying to discern the best treatment options for a health concern.  One doctor recommends this, one recommends that, one tries to push pills, one recommends “natural” treatments, one article says this, another article says that.  Often, the opinions are wildly contradictory.  How do you make a good decision in the face of such divergent viewpoints—especially when the purveyors of this or that position almost invariably stand to profit, directly or indirectly, from your agreeing with them?

Who do you trust when everyone has a vested interest in convincing you that they are right? Read more

On Heretics and “Heroic Feats of Cognitive Dissonance”

I’ve been spending some time in the first two chapters of Genesis over the last few weeks as we make our way into a summer worship series on creation.  And one cannot read very far in the literature about the first two chapters of the bible without at some point encountering the predictable, tendentious battles between evolutionary naturalism and creation, science and religion, etc.  It seems to me that those who get the most excited about these issues often quite badly misunderstand either the nature of science or the nature of religion.  Or both.  And this tends to lead to a considerable amount of heat and not a great deal of light being generated in public discourse on this issue.  Read more

A Silent Thunder

This has been a week of some pretty spectacular spring weather in our neck of the woods.  Violent thunderstorms, torrential rains, hail, wind… virtually every night has witnessed the pyrotechnics of heaven.  Today there are declarations of states of emergency, flood warnings, and evacuations across southern AB.  It’s been a pretty incredible few days.

After last night’s storm—which was the most violent one of the week, by far—I heard someone remark about how this kind of weather is evidence of the power and glory of God.  I somewhat sullenly bit my tongue.  Perhaps it was because I spent part of last night trying to stem the tide of water that was flowing into my basement bedroom and scrambling to rearrange furniture.  Perhaps it was because I spent another, much later part of last night teetering on a rickety ladder, trying to unclog my eaves troughs with frozen fingers in the blinding rain and darkness split open by periodic flashes of lightning.  Perhaps it was because all this rain is wreaking havoc with my soccer season!  Whatever the reasons, there were many things going through my mind during the storm last night, but mouthing paeans to the God of creation for his wondrous displays of power and glory was not among them.  I was mostly just wishing someone would turn off the tap. Read more

Seeing the Light

Based on my own entirely unscientific observations, it seems that there is a burgeoning market for “recovering pastor who saw the godless light” stories these days.  The genre is familiar enough by now, right?  Fundamentalist pastor grows up in the church, uncritically swallows the whole religious package, devotes x number of years to serving as pastor in [insert small Bible belt American town here], gradually begins to have doubts, finally has the courage to leave his (it’s almost always a “he” so far) faith behind, is persecuted, scorned and rejected by his townsfolk and former parishioners still imprisoned by the shackles of fantasy and indoctrination he has so recently (and heroically) shed, and eventually staggers into the warm and compassionate embrace of this or that atheist group devoted to helping recovering clergy.  And then, for the triumphant finale, our hero embarks on a life of spreading the good news of atheist liberation on [insert motivational speaking tour here] amassing inspiring (de)conversion narratives of other clergy that he has “helped” along the way.  It’s not a bad gig if you can get it. Read more

Why Do I Have Faith?

Last week, I found a message from a reader of this blog buried off in some dark corner of Facebook-land that I hadn’t noticed for at least a month.  It was a message that was both encouraging on a personal level, as well as provocative in the best sense of the word.  As it happens, the powers that be in Facebook have thus far prevented me from responding to this message.  Every time I try to reply, I get a message telling me that I cannot do so due to some setting in one of our accounts (I don’t have an email address for the person who wrote to me, so I’m at the mercy of Facebook).  Rather than wading through the labyrinth of Facebook’s privacy settings, I decided to do the only rational thing and simply write a blog post in response :). Read more

The World We (Don’t) Want

Our daughter belongs to a swim club, and swim clubs mean—hooray!—fundraising.  Bingo, specifically.  I have discovered that one of the (very few) benefits of spending five hours at the Bingo hall on a Thursday evening is the opportunity to catch up on a bit of reading (I was the “pay runner” last week, which meant that I basically sat around waiting for people to yell, “Bingo!” before springing enthusiastically into action).  Last Thursday, I brought along a book that had regrettably slipped to the bottom of the veritable mountain of unread books on my desk—Jim Holt’s Why Does the World Exist? Read more

A Place for Religion

So, this one has been making the rounds in the social media universe… Apparently, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, has “defeated” the world’s leading atheist evangelist Richard Dawkins in a recent debate at Cambridge University. Quite handily, in fact—324 votes to 136. The resolution under discussion was “religion has no place in the 21st century.” Apparently it still does. Rowan Williams has saved the 21st century… or at least the day. We can all take a deep breath and relax. Religion will be around for a while.

Read more